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Abscess vs Cavity: What You Should Know

  • Posted on: Jul 15 2019
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Waking up and experiencing a surge of dental pain isn’t something that anyone wants to experience. Two of the most common oral conditions that cause this type of pain are either a cavity or an abscess. So, what are the differences between these two, and how can hey be treated? Let’s take a closer look and see.

What’s A Cavity?

Cavities are more common than abscess teeth because they are typically detected earlier on. In simple terms, a cavity is a small hole in the tooth that can generally be visible.

The good thing about a cavity is that t can usually be treated with a dental filling. Depending on the type of insurance you have and the look that you want, you can choose an amalgam, porcelain, or metal filling. Once you select the filling that you want, Dr. Slepchik will then remove any bacteria from the tooth, and place the filling over the top of the tooth to help seal it off so that the hole doesn’t get worse.

What’s an Abscess?

An abscess usually forms when a cavity goes untreated. When this happens, it can cause two different types of abscesses:

  • A periapical n Abscess: This type of abscess takes place at the tip of the root of the tooth.
  • Periodontal Abscess: This type of abscess takes place in the gums and on the side of the root.

With either type of abscess, we try to treat it with a root canal. During a root canal, we will clear out the bacteria and remove the root of the tooth. Then, we will usually seal off the tooth so that no more bacteria can enter into it. In some rare instances, if the bacteria is severe, then we will have to remove the entire tooth and replace it with something like an implant.

Both cavities and abscessed teeth can cause similar symptoms, including tooth sensitivity, fever, swelling, pain, and overall discomfort. If you are suffering from any of these symptoms, schedule an appointment with us at our Montreal office and call 514-875-7971.

Posted in: General Dentistry